Tips for Burn Care and Treatment

Posted by Michelle Martinez on September 30, 2014No Comments

According to the American Burn Association, almost half a million individuals suffer some sort of burn every year. Moreover, according to stats from 2010, one person died from injuries sustained in fires every 169 minutes in that year. That is a rough estimate of eight people per day or 2,920 every year.

These are very frightening stats. Furthermore, these injuries can come from many sources. Whatever the case, when this happens it is important to know what to do to prevent unnecessary scarring, pain, and disfigurement while promoting rapid healing of the wounds or containing and soothing the burns until proper medical help arrives.

Types of Burns

Just in case you did not know, there are three degrees of burns. It is important for you to know this because it can be the difference between merely keeping them alive and preventing long-term scarring and infection.

· First-degree burns that typically only affect the outer layer of the skin and causes redness, swelling and pains

· Second-degree burns, otherwise called partial thickness burns, usually involve both the outer skin layers and the layers underneath. These typically have all the attributes of the first-degree burns and then blistering.  This is usually more painful than the first and can result in skin discoloration temporarily or permanently.

· Third-degree burns, otherwise referred to as full thickness, burns often involve the outer and deeper skin layers. These often result in blackened, disfigured and extensively scarred skin.

While most first-degree burns may fall into the category of mild or moderate burns which typically don’t cause much damage, the second and third-degree burns tend to be severe particularly when the significant areas of the body are involved.

Treatment and Care Options

There are quite a few treatment options when it comes to burn care and treatment. The following should serve as decent guides for you.

First Aid Treatment and Care

If in the kitchen, run some cool water on the burn, dip the part in cold water, or wrap a towel soaked in cool water around the area. This should help prevent blistering and swelling. Then cover the burn using a dry, sterile bandage or cloth. Whatever you do, don’t apply ice or cold water. They tend to cause more skin damage and worsen the burns. If a person is in pain and the injury does not look bad, get them some pain relief meds. Some believe that using honey, grease, oil spray and butter will relieve the burns, but you must avoid applying these as they tend to worsen the burns, cause friction or induce swelling.

Proper Burn Care and Treatments

Please always note that first aid treatments are meant to keep the victim in stable condition or help them stay uninfected until the doctor arrives. If it is first-degree burns, you may not need to call a doctor – at least not until it is clearly infected. However, if it is second and third degree burns, get a doctor immediately after making the person comfortable.

The best thing to do, however, would be to avoid anything that will cause you any burns. Take all preventive measures and keep yourself safe from any harm and danger. That way, you will be safe and unlikely to suffer any burns.

Sources:

http://www.ameriburn.org/resources_factsheet.php

About the author:

The writer, Oscar King, is a former EMT residing in Orlando who has dealt with a number of burn injuries, many of which were caused by the negligence of others. If you have suffered this type or any other type of injury due to somebody else’s carelessness, he highly recommends finding a qualified personal injury attorney such as David Heil, PA. You can learn more about Oscar on Google+.

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